The Freedom To Thrive…

The popular sustainability discussion often holds references to animal care. From corporate statements made by McDonalds and Walmart to sensational allegations from news sources like Consumer Reports – the way that food animals are raised provides a veritable battle ground for today’s food debates.

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  • What is the correct care?
  • Who defines it?
  • Is it based on science or philosophy – or a blend of both?

With each day that passes, dialogues regarding food production practices trend beyond the farm gate to include the thoughts and ideas of an incredibly diversified audience. In 2015, the general expectation of a safe food supply is constantly expanding to also include philosophical preferences for how it is raised. I am proud of the many different types of systems used to grow food. This diversity is a tribute to the innovation of America’s farmers. It is cause for celebration, not cause for persecution.

Rigorous debates inspire positive critical examination and can result in continuous improvement. However, I grow weary of the sensational drama currently permeating the conversations involving the topic of animal welfare. To me, good cattle welfare can be defined with one simple question.

Do the animals have the freedom to thrive?

Cattle are raised with the sole purpose of contributing to the food supply. Healthy animals make healthy beef – Cattle that are raised with the freedom to thrive are healthy. It’s not rocket science, and it’s not cause for battle. It also should not be sensationalized to instigate media coverage or personal gain. Animal welfare is not about the person who eats the beef, rather it is about the calf that is raised to provide it.

These 1300# steers at my feed yard exhibit exuberant play behavior demonstrating their freedom to thrive…

Many, many different environments exist in which cattle can thrive. The animal welfare debate should not be about the type of system, rather it should be based on whether the system is managed by the farmer to allow for the animals to have the freedom to thrive. Grass pasture or feed yard, organic or traditionally raised – the basis for quality cattle welfare lies in the ability of the farmer to create an environment in which the calf can prosper. A good farmer works tirelessly for this regardless of the label that he/she places on the package of beef.

Long term food sustainability as well as the integrity of the United States protein supply lies in the hands of America’s farmers. It is wrapped up in their ability to nurture – to blend science and practical daily care with the art of intuition. It is providing for the practical needs of the animal while also taking the time to be a compassionate good shepherd.

It’s not about the grass pasture or the feed yard pen, it’s about the culture of caring that exists regardless of the type of farm.

The current discussion of animal welfare has gone terribly awry because it is no longer about the animal. It is lost in a great pit of sensational and politically motivated confusion.

Isn’t it time that Americans once again focus on defining animal welfare from the point of view of the animal receiving the care?

annemattbeef1

It won’t be a sensational story, but it will result in food raised with integrity.

4 Comments

Filed under Animal Welfare, General

4 responses to “The Freedom To Thrive…

  1. Heather

    Well said, I could not agree more. Too many times companies are using this as a marketing tool and not realizing what management and health care needs the animal has to remain healthy and not suffer.

    • Thank you, Heather! It is critical that farmers stand up for the welfare of their livestock. We need to have a seat at the table for this discussion. I appreciate your support🙂

      Best,
      Anne

  2. Rex

    Thank you. I like your definition of animal welfare as freedom to thrive.
    I read the consumer report. Looks like they are drumming up membership interest and think the October 2015 issue will increase subscription rates. First thing I wonder is how did Consumer Reports and John’s Hopkins get so biased? Then I wonder, is bearded technician photo typical of the loose care with which samples were handled (My ICU nurse daughter tells me that 70% of people have MRSA hiding in their nostrils).. Then I wonder, do you actually feed soy, chicken coop waste, byproducts from pig and poultry slaughter, and plastic pellets as the suggest with their long list of ingredients conventionally raised beef may be fed?
    Feedstuffs has a polite review of the consumer report:
    http://feedstuffs.com/story-consumer-reports-study-explores-superbugs-ground-beef-45-131373-spx_1
    Thank you again Anne.

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