Tag Archives: moving forward during hard times

accepting Comfort…

Wednesday Wisdom 🙂


Inspiration this week comes from the Gospel of Matthew 11: 28-30

“Then Jesus said, ‘Come to me, all of you who are weary and carry heavy burdens, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you. Let me teach you, because I am humble and gentle at heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy to bear, and the burden I give you is light.'”


Not a day passes when I do not need comfort. Whether small hurts build up to weigh down my heart, or a single large burden dominates my mind, I rarely go through a day when finding and accepting comfort is not important. In those moments of pain, my brain tempts me to look for logical answers despite the fact that my heart is very clearly needing the comfort of peace. The outcome of my daily experiences tends to be tied to which of two possible questions I choose to ask God: Do I ask “why” something is happening and get stuck at the very beginning, or do I accept the challenge and instead choose to ask “how” we can get through it together?

Jesus tells us repeatedly in the Gospels, “Take up your daily cross and follow me.” Often I find myself puzzled by that message, and trying to meld it together with the above passage from Matthew. What cross is my cross? And, what does it truly mean to take it up and follow him? Is the cross the yoke Jesus reverences in the above scripture? I found clarity on this as I read Henri J.M. Nouwen’s book, Following Jesus. Nouwen points out that Jesus says to “Take up your cross” – he doesn’t say, create a cross or to take up someone else’s. He suggests that our cross is our own pain, our own hurts, and that taking up our cross means that we have the courage to see that pain.

Perhaps as we answer Jesus’s call to pick up our pain, then we are able to yoke it to the healing presence of the cross. There we can accept the comfort and peace of a God that loves first and can sooth our hearts. 


As I think back on my life, I remember all of the times that I said – “I’m tough. I can do this. I don’t need any help. I can suffer through it.” Do you ever tell yourself that? I’m figuring out that when I do this, I hide my burden and honestly try to hide from it. That makes it become heavier and heavier because it surrounds me at the same time that I deny that it exists. Perhaps being tough isn’t the point…God doesn’t want us to just suffer through it. He wants us to pick up our cross so that He can compassionately comfort us as we travel the journey together. When I acknowledge my pain and share it, then I am able to shift my focus. The pain is still there, but it moves to the background because I am surrounded by comforting love that breaks through the fear.

“Perfect love casts out all fear” – my good days are the ones that I lean into that 🙂 Our God is a God of unconditional love, not of fear. At the cross, he accepts our fear and our hurts, and exchanges them for love. That’s where we find rest in Jesus’ yoke, and it is where we come to accept the comfort that lightens our burdens. The pain doesn’t go away, the challenge remains, but we ask “how” instead of asking “why”. As we lift our eyes and ask “how”, we accept our cross and lean into our humble and gentle God who leads us in love.

This week I am leaning in. I am in the process of moving my older two girls into college – one in Indiana and the other in North Carolina. I’m traveling cross-country and leaving pieces of my heart behind with each of the girls. It’s hard. It hurts. But, I know that they are where God called them to be and I am accepting comfort from the abundant love that awaits me as I pick up those hurts and bring them to the cross.

 

6 Comments

Filed under General, Wednesday Wisdom

Learning To Abide…

Wednesday Wisdom 🙂


Inspiration this week comes from James 1: 2-5

“Dear brothers and sisters, when troubles of any kind come your way, consider it an opportunity for great joy. For you know that when your faith is tested, your endurance has a chance to grow. So let it grow, for when your endurance is fully developed, you will be perfect and complete, needing nothing.”


This is one of my favorite verses. I don’t just enjoy it, I need the perspective that it brings. While I like challenge, real troubles sometimes stump me. When fatigue sets in, I begin to question God’s plan as I forget to let go of the hurt and simply abide in Jesus’s love.

About 10 days ago, I fell on the snow and ice and broke my right ankle and lower leg. I was delivering lasagna to the high school to help feed the Lady Haymaker basketball team and I slipped and fell as I transitioned from the parking lot up the handicap access to the side walk. I had surgery last Thursday and am now the proud owner of a 10 screw plate in my lower right leg, as well as a few extra “long screws” (holding my ligament in place) that will have to be removed after my leg heals. I’m non-weight bearing and in a cast for six weeks before beginning physical therapy.

There is never a good time to have an accident. I have to admit that I’ve had moments over the past 10 days when I’ve wanted to fall apart. After one of those moments, my favorite farmer came hurrying down the hallway. He said: “Okay, the guy on the radio just said that James says to find joy in your challenges because they bring you endurance and a stronger faith.”

I think that’s the first time that Matt has ever quoted scripture to me– and it made me smile that he’d been listening to MyBridge Radio and had picked up on some of my favorite verses. I’ve yet to figure out why my accident happened, but God has sent me several very clear signs like this one that He is with me on the journey 🙂


As Christians, Jesus calls each one of us to abide in His love.

To be on His team.

The invitation is open to everyone and it’s there on the good days as well as the hard ones. It’s there, we simply need to put it on. Our pastor talked about this same thing on Sunday and it was so truly meaningful to me. As we abide in Christ, our hearts become full of Jesus’ love. There is no limit to His love which brings both peace in the moment and hope for the future. Our ultimate call is to share that love. Not just to love our neighbor as ourself, but to love them as Jesus loves us.

That’s a big deal.

We often pray for God’s help, but how often do we sign up to whole-heartedly and intentionally be on His team? The culture of love only develops when we are all in. That’s because God uses all of us to reflect Jesus’ love — it can’t be reflected if no one answers the call. When we sign up to be on the team, we need to be willing to put in the work.

I saw this picture on facebook last week and it really resonated with me.

Perhaps this is part of what James is talking about.

I am coming to understand that there is both joy and honor to be found in being a member of God’s team. The hard things still come; but there is a purpose to them as Jesus uses the experiences to mold us into something more complete – more loving – more meaningful. Sometimes learning is hard, but Jesus’ love makes impossible things possible.

What if all we really need to do is to more deeply abide in His love so that following His direction becomes a natural out-pouring from our hearts?

One day, maybe we’ll wake up to find that we are so completely filled with grace that we are in need of nothing.

That will be a good day 🙂

8 Comments

Filed under General, Wednesday Wisdom

Think like a calf…Then open the gate!

We originally were missing about 45 head…Monday morning the number was down to 13…Today it is down to 10…

10 is too many, but better than 45.

I found two calves last night in our corn field.  I got smart—thought like a calf—used patience and good cattle handling savvy—and got them in.  My cowboy and I found a third calf at the neighbor’s this morning.  We are gaining.

The second calf in the field approaching the fence...(I wasn't organized enough to have my camara for the first one...)

Handling cattle in a corral system is very different than handling cattle “at liberty” with no fences.  If any of you do Natural Horsemanship, you may be familiar with the concept of “liberty” and the communication system that you set up with your horse which enables you to interact (either on the ground or in the saddle) with no halter/bridle or lead rope.

Horses "at liberty" in a pasture...Two of them are asking me a question...

Handling cattle at liberty follows the same concepts, but the animals are much “flightier” or wilder.  Small movements mean big things, and it takes a lot of savvy to move a lone animal through a big field with tall crops and then through a gate.

The corn is 6' tall (I am only a measly 5'3" and the calf is much shorter than that...)

It also requires you to “think like a calf” in order to increase your chances of success.  Cattle are concerned with safety (they prefer being in herds/groups), they are concerned with having enough to eat (not a problem out in big green fields with growing vegetation!), they are concerned with finding water to drink.

What did I do?

I put a big red mineral tub in the middle of the gateway (mineral “licks” or “tubs” are a good magnet for cattle–they love them!).  We turned on the water tank that is near the gate.  I waited until dusk when cattle are more likely to be active in the warm summer months…and when the calves that are still in my feed yard are more likely to bawl or vocalize which will “call” the missing calves back into the group.

The mineral tub and water tank that are by the gate...

One by one two animals showed up…

I worked each calf (they showed up about 30 minutes apart) quietly and carefully down the field and toward the gate.  I waited for them to find the mineral tub and move through the gate.

I guided the calves down the alleyway and back to the home pen.

The first calf--turning to ask me a question as I moved him down the alley way. At that moment, I am "outside of his bubble" and he is confident enough to ask me for guidance.

I did all of this with great patience and small movements in my body focusing on pressure and release once I figured out where each calf’s “bubble” was.  Each calf is surrounded by an invisible “bubble”.  If you apply pressure to the bubble, then the calf will move.  It is important to only gently apply pressure to this bubble (especially in a situation where you are at “liberty” with no fences for help).  When the calf responds appropriately, then you release the pressure.  This pressure and release system is a good way to communicate with cattle (and horses too).

I penetrated the calf's bubble and he moved away from me and down the alley...

Watching the body language of the calf tells you when you penetrate his “bubble”.  This requires patience and focus.

The mosquitoes made a very tenacious attempt to “eat me alive” while I was up in the corn field.  I kept my focus on the calf and ignored the bugs…Slapping at mosquitoes with a flighty calf nearby will send the calf running in a “flight” behavior pattern which is virtuously impossible for a handler to manipulate.

Back in the home pen and bawling to his herdmates...He seems glad to be there...

I got home after dark, tired, but feeling a sense of accomplishment.  Who would have thought that a city kid from Florida would be able to act as a “calf whisperer”?

The second calf heading back in to the "home pen" with the herdmates that came out to greet him...

I am still moving forward, I am still praying that we will recover the other 10 calves, I am still caring, and I am still exhausted.  But, under it all, I know that I am gaining.  I know that I am a good calf caregiver.  And, I know that tomorrow will again be a better day.

Back home after a long day...

6 Comments

Filed under Animal Welfare, Beef Life Cycle--Calf #718, General