Tag Archives: care

A Capacity to Care…

I remember twenty years ago when a mentor told me, “Anne — your animals don’t care how much you know until they understand how much you care.” While cattle are unable to think like humans, they do have the capacity to learn and I believe that they also have an innate sense which helps them to figure out when a caregiver can be trusted.

The capacity to care is what sets an excellent caregiver apart from everyone else. This person not only provides feed, water and basic daily care to his/her animals; but also brings a sense of security to the animal. While survival provides the innate goal for the animal, the ability to thrive is what creates a higher quality of life that results in an increased ability to convert resources into food.

The secret to thriving finds its root in a caregiver’s capacity to care.

We moved the Lazy YN yearling steers off of grass this week. Having gained 135# and weighing in at 785#, the cattle were ready to move into the feed yard for the final phase of the growth cycle. As we gathered them and then waited in the corral for the trucks to arrive to load, I watched my favorite blonde cowgirl interact with the cattle and I just had to smile. Not only does she get it, calf #963 gets it too. How else can you explain this video demonstrating the bovine boogie?

While I am certainly not proclaiming that everyone needs to teach their cattle to dance, I do think that Megan does a nice job demonstrating that bovine curiosity and the capacity to learn finds its root in the ability of the leader to create trust through a high level of understanding and care.

The main video for Feed Yard Foodie this week appears on the Innovative Livestock Services, Inc. facebook page and twitter feed; so you all will have to head on over there to check it out as it gives a comprehensive look at the Lazy YN cattle — where they came from, how we cared for them on our farm, and where they head to next 🙂

In the meantime, take a few minutes this week to think about how you can increase your capacity to care. Whether it is in your relationships with animals or with humans, the more you care — the better the quality of life.

 

 

 

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Filed under General, Video Fun on the Farm

Proving That We Care…

Just a couple of weeks ago, a social media friend forwarded me an email that she had received from a reader.  The email was a cry for help from a fellow mom.  It seems that her daughter, after repeatedly watching horrific videos of animal abuse on the internet, had refused to eat any animal products.

I do not have that added challenge with my daughters because they help to raise the beef that we eat.

I do not have that added parenting challenge with my daughters because they help to raise the beef that we eat.

Concerned about both her daughter’s nutritional needs and the abusive videos, the mom was reaching out to online farmer bloggers in an attempt to find out the truth.  When I sent a link to several videos of my farm to the mom, she responded “Why can’t I find these when I search on YouTube?  These are the types of videos that we need to see!”

The short answer to that question is that search results on YouTube are ranked according to number of views.  This means that the more views a video has, the more likely that it will show up when you search a topic.  I have uploaded four “home-made” videos to YouTube over the last year—they have a total of only 1500 views.

This one is my favorite–it is my 10 year old cowgirl/chef exercising cattle at the feed yard to the tune of her favorite song “Fly Over States”.

  • I love this video because I am proud of my daughter and what a great cattle caregiver she is becoming.
  • I love this video because it shows the simplicity of good cattle handling.
  • I love this video because of the calf with the white spot on his head that kept asking Megan “do I have to” when she asked him to move.  Megan frequently looks at me asking the same question…

    Where did the trust go?

    Where did the trust go?

Twenty years ago, trust existed throughout the food production system.  Farmers were viewed positively, and those outside of the farm believed that farmers had integrity.  Today, that trust is gone.  I believe that this loss of trust is one of the biggest travesties currently affecting our great country.  Quite simply, it hurts my heart to know that many people do not trust that I care.

ProgressiveBeefLogoGreen

My brain recognizes that it is my duty to not only care, but also to document that care in an attempt to rebuild that trust.  The daily care that I offer to my animals is now accompanied by record keeping and documentation that will verify that I not only care, but that I am competent in that care.

My other job---paper work!

My other job—paper work!

Animal Care is the second pillar of the Progressive Beef program.  It is one that I believe in with every fiber of my being.  Outstanding animal care is a trademark of my feed yard.  Progressive Beef has provided me with both a documentation trail, and also a third party independent audit to bring additional integrity to my promise of high quality animal care.

Rest assured that you can feel good about feeding my beef to your family—it came from healthy and humanely raised animals.  You don’t have to just take my word for it!

I feel the capacity to care is the thing which gives life its deepest significance.

Pablo Casals

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Filed under Animal Welfare, CAFO, General, Progressive Beef QSA Program