Tag Archives: agvocacy

Touching Base…

It seems that although I have been busy engaging on social media, that I have not done a good job checking in with each of you at Feed Yard Foodie. I am in the process of developing a new weekly theme to carry through the winter; but have not had the opportunity to get it completely lined out in my mind. I hope to have this started next week.

In the meantime, I figured that I would share links to my work on social media for Innovative Livestock Services and the Beef Marketing Group. For those of you that follow me on facebook, you have seen this content. For those of you that don’t, I hope that you will take a look at it. I found it very personally meaningful to create 🙂

2018 started with a video describing the Beef Marketing Group — who we are — and what we value. For those of you who wonder about the agricultural cooperative that I work for, this will give you a glimpse of the people and our focus.

This week premiered another video talking about “What is life like in a cattle feedlot?” This video appeared on Innovative Livestock Services as part of our educational series to provide accurate information to folks interesting in learning about “where their beef comes from”. The video is performing amazingly well on facebook with over 30,500 views in the two days that it has been up 🙂

For those of you that like to read words instead of watching videos, here is a link to a blog post that I recently wrote comparing living space in a feedlot to New York City.

I hope that each one of you experienced a blessed Christmas season and a Happy New Year! Thank you for all that you do to support me on this social media journey. #togetherwearestronger

Leave a comment

Filed under General, ILS Beef / Beef Marketing Group, Video Fun on the Farm

It’s Just Money…

DSC03742A couple of really smart people told me at the beginning of my blogging journey to never write or talk about money when visiting with people outside of agriculture. The subject is difficult to navigate and often results in negative exchanges.  After following this advice for more than four years, last week I deviated and addressed the topic in the middle of a presentation at a local university.

The University of Nebraska @ Kearney offers classes for retired Nebraskans looking to expand their knowledge. For the past two years, I have presented in a class that teaches about agriculture. This group of “students” provides a truly unique audience as many of them are retired college professors who possess incredibly curious minds and no inhibitions relative to asking questions.

After a 45 minute exchange with the class, I prepared to close my talk when an older gentleman sitting in the third row caught my eye as he raised his hand with a question. He had read an article talking about the commodity markets, in particular the negative margins experienced recently in the cattle feeding business. He asked me how I protected my farm financially so that I could make a consistent profit.

My simple answer, “That is an impossible task”, led to an interesting array of facial expressions across the audience. Another hand immediately went up as the audience started to ask more questions about profit, loss, and farmers’ financial sustainability.   I thought briefly of the advice from my beef advocating mentors , but decided to go with my gut feeling and answer the flurry of questions.

We talked of the recent economic crisis plaguing beef farmers, the need for better risk management tools for farmers, and the importance of diversity in agriculture as a basic protection tool for long term sustainability. One of the hardest lessons that I have learned in my 19 years of caring for cattle is that regardless of the quality of both my animal care and the quality of the beef that my animals produce, I am ultimately at the mercy of the market relative to making a profit.

My favorite farmer’s grandfather learned many, many years ago to not put all of his eggs in one basket. For that reason, our farm grows a variety of products (corn, cattle, alfalfa, and soybeans) to sell into a variety of markets (traditionally grown as well as organic niche sales). This helps to protect us against experiencing paralyzing losses when market volatility strikes. We also follow the old fashioned adage: save when the years are good so that it is possible to sustain in the years that are bad.

The latest issue of Drover’s Magazine reports that feeding cattle in 2015 resulted in an economic crisis where United States farmers lost a total of $4.7 billion dollars over the 12 month period. The Feed Yard Foodie farm was not immune to this industry wide catastrophe, and the cattle portion of our farm has sustained significant losses since April of 2015. While this has been psychologically difficult for me, our farm business is solid enough that we are persevering in the long run.

When the class finally broke for the day, a woman from the audience came over and put her arm around me. I was truly humbled when she said, “I had no idea that farmers ever lost money. I will pray for you and your family because what you do is important and now I understand just how hard it is.”

I learned an important lesson that afternoon – sometimes compassion and vulnerability trump pride, and the truth is often the very best answer.  I do not even know that very special lady’s name, but I will remember her face and her kind words for the rest of my life.  Her compassion serves as a reminder that it is okay to be human, and that at the end of the day it’s just money

17 Comments

Filed under Foodie Work!, General

Refilling the Cup…

Katie Pinke of the Pinke Post made a comment on Facebook last week stating the difficulty of finding ways to “refill the cup” as an advocate for agriculture. Katie has many years of experience in social media and her intuitive thoughts often leave me pondering. As advocates for agriculture, our cups of energy are often depleted. Learning how to refill them is a journey of survival.

annecattlemiranda.jpgThis April will mark the 5th year anniversary of the Feed Yard Foodie blog. Four hundred and eighty nine blog posts and almost a million views (from a half a million visitors) separate the naïve cattle feeder of 2011 with the seasoned (and somewhat hardened) blogger of 2016. So much has changed since the birth of this blog, and yet, so much remains the same.

It takes an enormous amount of optimism and energy to brave the social media world that revolves around agriculture. On a good day, you pick up a follower who shares some common ground and wishes to further understand “where food comes from”. On a bad day, you are threatened and disparaged with an appalling lack of basic respect.

As I close in on five years, I find myself reflecting and attempting to rationalize the volunteer time and energy that I pour into Feed Yard Foodie. I try to look past the heartache that sometimes permeates my outreach to find the shining light that leads me to continue down the ag-vocacy trail. It takes a constant effort to figure out how to tap that unlimited source of energy which serves to fuel the blog amidst the regular list of chores that go along with being a mom and a feed yard boss lady.

I tell my girls that the most important life skill they will learn is perseverance. Perseverance is all about refilling the cup. My words take on a new depth of meaning as they watch me “cowgirl” up and continue the journey. They live with the stubbornly independent mom and boss lady, just as they watch the vulnerable woman struggle to find the courage to continue to share her story.

My girls work every day to refill my cup because they watch first hand as others deplete it. I do not shield them from my struggles, and it teaches them to not only persevere but also to empathize and offer compassion to those in need.

Life is hard. It is filled with demands that work to deplete the cup. I believe that the difference between those who persevere and those who do not lies in the ability to gather the love and optimism that is required to refill the cup. That is a very personal journey as everyone’s cup is unique.

Below are five things that I have learned to rely on for the past five years in order to persevere:

  1. Accept that everyone (including you) is human. Learn to forgive.
  2. Notice your blessings – learn to look for the good as it is what refills your cup.
  3. Draw a line between your real life and your cyber life – understand that the majority of what refills your cup comes from personal interactions outside of the internet.
  4. Take the time to be pensive – quiet thinking breeds both respect and learning.
  5. Understand that temporarily walking away is not failure – rather it is a necessary component to finding the courage to continue.

I do not know how to measure the success of my agricultural outreach, but I can recognize the personal growth that has occurred as a result of it. The road to excellence is rarely comfortable and I can attest to the fact that being an advocate for agriculture is not a comfortable journey. I am thankful to all of you loyal Feed Yard Foodie readers as you play a vital role pushing me to search for continuous improvement on my farm. You all help to refill my cup by reading, commenting, and sharing of yourselves.

15 Comments

Filed under A Farmer's View on Foodie Thoughts..., General