The Final Days of Summer…

Yesterday morning marked the official end of summer for the youth of Cozad.  Each year, the first day of school creates a natural transition from the summer to the fall.  Transitions always challenge me and this year was no exception to the rule.  I find comfort in routine (perhaps that is why I am a good cattle caregiver), and it tends to throw me off when change occurs.

My favorite blonde cowgirl shares this tendency with me, so this last week has been bittersweet for us.  Megan spent the summer working on her cattle handling skills helping me to exercise calves and also participating on the processing crew.  Last Wednesday we received a group of new cattle into the feed yard, and I gave Megan the responsibility of exercising them during the acclimation period.  While she often acts as an assistant during acclimation, these steers provided the inaugural group for her to acclimate on her own.

Trailing cattle down the alley during a dawn exercising session...

Trailing cattle down the alley during a dawn exercising session…

The previous owner did a great job teaching his calves to trust a human caregiver, so these animals provided an excellent group for Megan to guide through the process. The video below shows her moving the cattle out of the home pen at the beginning of the last acclimation/exercising session Sunday morning.

By the end of the acclimation period, the cattle have learned to attribute comfort to the home pen, and prefer to remain there rather than feeling a natural drive to go somewhere else.  Watching a group of cattle make this shift (from wanting to leave, to desiring to stay) is a fascinating process.  It takes several days (these cattle were on day 5) and requires cattle savvy to guide them to this change.  A few thoughts as you watch the video:

  1. When you have a lone handler and many animals, the first step is to herd the animals together in a group — this both makes them feel more comfortable and also makes leading them easier.
  2. The second step is to ask them to move in a designated direction through the use of alternate pressure.  They should continue moving in this direction until something stops them (like a fence or a closed gate).  An open gate allows for them to leave the pen when asked.
  3. Calm cattle under good leadership walk in straight lines with positive energy.
  4. Consistent and confident handler behavior makes learning easier for the cattle.

    Newly arrived cattle traveling back to the home pen after an exercising session...

    Newly arrived cattle traveling back to the home pen after an exercising session…

Good cattle handling instills important leadership qualities in the caregiver.  Cattle are very sensitive, yet they are willing to look for guidance and leadership when the handler can empathize and correctly gauge their “human interaction bubble”.  I believe that the most important skill to develop when working with animals is the ability to look outside of yourself, viewing the world through their perspective, while still retaining the confidence of a leader.  It has been fun for me, both as an animal welfare enthusiast and as a mom, to watch Megan develop these skills.

One last moment of rambunctious joy before loading in cars to head to the first day of school...

One last moment of rambunctious joy before loading in cars to head to the first day of school…

Yesterday, Megan traded the feed yard for 8th grade.  There, she will learn different things using different learning tools than those developed on the farm.  I do believe that her summer lessons will grant her a broader educational perspective.  I have to admit that we were both very sad to have the summer come to an end.  I will miss my cattle handling assistant and she will miss being a valued member of our feed yard crew.

familyfeedyard2015.jpg

 With each summer that draws to an end, I realize how quickly my girls are growing up and find myself wanting to hit the “pause” button. 

Some days it seems that parenting is a bittersweet journey.

 

8 Comments

Filed under Animal Welfare, General

8 responses to “The Final Days of Summer…

  1. John Butler

    Megan looks like a little anne You should be very proud!

    John Butler Sent from my iPhone

  2. theranchwifechronicles

    Good Luck as you and your family transition to the back to school and fall schedule, Anne. Megan reminds me of a few youth that I used to know. Kudos to you and the Hubby on raising three awesome girls.

    • Thank you, Robyn. I always struggle with the fall school transition a bit and this year seems worse than usual. I love spending time with my girls and find myself not wanting to part with them when they have to go back to school! Megan and I head down to Texas A&M for a speaking engagement visit in a couple of weeks and I am looking forward to that immensely. She, of course, is very sad to have to miss school for it…Ha Ha

      I hope that you all are doing well up north. We have been cool and rainy here the past few days. Not the best haying weather but my cattle think it is pretty great!

      Take care. It’s always good to hear from you.
      Anne

  3. Kathy Bottrell

    WOW. She is good. Any young gal that is willing to take on a whole pen of cattle won’t be bothered by some punk kid trying to make trouble for her. Lol

  4. Micheal J. Curtice

    Anne,
    I teach a course on Biblical Leadership and find your lessons on leading cattle very similar to basic leadership overall. May I use your four points in my next leadership course?

    Micheal J. Curtice, Th. D.

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