Farm Check: The Goal

I have to admit that as a child and teenager, I never gave a thought to where my food came from.  I took both the food and my mother’s wonderful home cooked dinners completely for granted.  As a dedicated athlete who trained four hours a day, I consumed a lot of food—thinking about nutrition and fuel for my body, but never giving a second to think about what it took to grow it.

Finishing an ocean mile race as part of my training twenty years ago...

Finishing an ocean mile race as part of my training twenty years ago…

I’ll never forget the look on my husband’s face the first time that he attended a team dinner for the Dartmouth Women’s Swim Team.  As a college football player he was no stranger to eating, but the feeding frenzy that he witnessed that night left him speechless.  He wisely decided to step aside and let my team mates and I eat our fill before attempting to enter the food line himself…

As I transitioned from competitive athlete to farm girl, I found myself (for the first time) taking an active role in both understanding and growing food.  When I moved to Nebraska in 1997, I had complete trust in modern food production but very little understanding of it.

The day that I graduated from college--pictured with my husband and brother.  The next day, I began to trek from New Hampshire to Nebraska to begin a new life...

College graduation: pictured with my husband and brother. The next day, I began to trek from New Hampshire to Nebraska to begin a new life…

Somewhere in the last 16 years, universal trust in food production has been eroded.  Farming practices have been questioned as well as the integrity of the farmer that implements them.  This saddens me.  While I truly believe that every person has a right to understand where their food comes from, I also believe that it is important to truly understand before passing judgement.

The challenge that we all face is the ever growing gap between farmers and urbanites.  Whenever a disconnect like this occurs, myths perpetuate and misinformation stands in the way of good conversation and understanding.  Perception becomes a cloud of fog that hinders trust and stands in the way of true learning and comprehension.

I believe that I care for him responsibly, and I want to share that story of care with you...

I believe that I care for him responsibly, and I want to share that story of care with you…

Somehow philosophers like Michael Pollan and Eric Schlosser have become the authority on food production, while farmers like myself have become the evil opportunists.  While I can certainly respect that every person has a right to their own beliefs, it bothers me tremendously to read books like Fast Food Nation that misrepresent both who I am and what happens on my farm.

  • I believe with all of my heart that responsible food production must universally exist.
  • I believe with all of my heart that this responsible food production includes quality animal care.
  • I believe with all of my heart that a deep understanding of food animals and their needs must play the key role in determining what defines proper care.
  • I believe with all of my heart that good care leads to healthy animals and a safe food supply.
  • I believe with all of my heart that together farmers and urbanites can come together to build relationships and understanding relative to meat production.

The goal of the Tyson Farm Check program is to bring scientists and farmers together with our customers to rebuild trust while also continually learning how to improve farm animal care.

Do we care?  Absolutely! 

Can we get better?  Absolutely!FarmChecklogo

  The goal is to build trust while responsibly growing safe and nutritious food.

8 Comments

Filed under General, Tyson Farm Check Program

8 responses to “Farm Check: The Goal

  1. Another great educational post. Farm Check sounds like a good new program :)
    I hope your weather is staying sunny in NE. Have a good week :)

    • We have been mostly sunny but still with cool temperatures. My favorite farmer is hoping for some “heat units” to help our crops grow. We have been blessed with some timely rains, but are hanging onto cooler temperatures.

      The heater at our community outdoor pool is currently broken, so my swim team members think that between the cold air and water that they are freezing! I keep telling them that it is a “character building experience” which makes my favorite teenager want to roll her eyes at me! :)

      Anne

      • LOL I remember cold pool days I don’t think if them as “character building”, but that is what I was told too.. funny ;)
        We have the rain and cooler temps. I hope you get some heat fro those crops with continued “timely rain”

  2. Bill

    Considering an active female competitive swimmer would have eaten his hand, your husband was wise to let the ladies go first.

  3. Carol

    Thanks, Anne, keep up the good work educating the public.

  4. Pingback: Raising the Bar Higher… | Feed Yard Foodie

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